[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith


OpenSuse Leap 42.2 goes a long way toward maintaining Suse’s reputation for reliability and stability. That said, new users might need a push to take the leap from their familiar distros to this latest OpenSuse release. Business users can remain confident that upgrading to the latest edition won’t put them too close to the bleeding edge of innovation. There is little cause for worry that upgrading might break their current applications and configurations. Leap 42.2 is a safe way to avoid the pitfalls of upgrading too quickly.

Google Gives Devs First Look at Android O


Google on Tuesday unveiled a developer preview of the latest version of its mobile operating system, code named “Android O.” The new OS is designed to improve on battery life and interactive performance of devices, according to Dave Burke, vice president of engineering, Android, at Google.
The new release puts automatic limits on what applications do in the background in three areas: implicit broadcasts, background services and location updates. Updated developer previews will become available in the coming months.

Cracking the Shell


If you’ve begun to tinker with your desktop Linux terminal, you may be ready to take a deeper dive. You’re no longer put off by references to “terminal,” “command line” or “shell,” and you have a grasp of how files are organized. You can distinguish between a command, an option and an argument. You’ve begun navigating your system. Now what? File manipulation — that is, allowing users to traverse the directory structure and interact with its contents — lies at the heart of Linux. There is a sizable arsenal of tools at your disposal.

IBM Launches Enterprise-Strength Blockchain as a Service


IBM on Monday unveiled the first enterprise-ready Blockchain as a Service offering based on The Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Fabric version 1.0. IBM Blockchain, which lets developers quickly establish highly secure blockchain networks on the IBM cloud, is a transformative step in being able to deploy high-speed, secure business transactions through the network on a large scale, the company said. The platform offers the world’s safest Linux infrastructure, with tamper-responsive hardware security modules, according to IBM.

Google Unveils Guetzli, Open Source JPEG Encoder, to Speed Browsing


Google on Thursday announced Guetzli, a new contribution to its evolving set of tools for the open source community. Guetzli is an encoder that allows JPEG files to be compressed as much as 35 percent, resulting in much faster Web page loading. “Guetzli,” which means “cookie” in Swiss German, allows users to create smaller JPEG images while maintaining compatibility with existing Web browsers, image processing applications and the existing JPEG standard, noted Robert Obryk and Jyrki Alakuijala, software engineers at Google Research Europe.

Slackel Openbox Plays Hard to Get


Slackel’s Openbox edition is a lightweight operating system that offers reliable performance once you get the box open. It is not ideal for every user, though. Slackel 6.0.8 Openbox, the latest version of the project’s lightweight distribution, was released by developer Dimitris Tzemos last fall. Slackel is a Linux distro that offers several benefits for users who step away from the typical mainstream Debian-based Linux distros. Based on both Slackware and Salix, it offers a few advantages not usually found with the Slackware Linux lineup.

Accenture and Docker Team on Container Services


Accenture and Docker on Wednesday announced an expanded global alliance and the availability of container services within the Accenture Cloud Factory. The new services provide a faster industrialized on-ramp solution for enterprises moving to the cloud. They focus on container enablement of applications and feature use of Docker Datacenter Enterprise Edition – Standard. Docker Datacenter is an integrated container management platform for development and IT operations that brings security, policy and controls to the software delivery lifecycle.

Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux

Long years ago, we’ve talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.

qtox skype replacement for linux
qTox: Free and Open Source Skype Replacement for Linux
Tox is a peer-to-peer instant-messaging and video-calling protocol that offers end-to-end encryption. There are two popular clients built on top of Tox, namely uTox and qTox. Here we will discuss about qTox, the more feature-rich and configurable of the two.

qtox skype alternative ubuntu

The work flow of qTox video chat client is pretty straight forward. You just need to share you unique Tox ID (the one you get after you sign up) with the person you want to chat. Friend requests pop-up in your screen once it is sent and you can either accept or reject it. qTox is fully featured with support for video/voice chat (picture-in-picture mode for video calls), sending/receiving files, screen-sharing etc. By default, video chat is disabled for security reasons and you need to enable it first in qTox-Settings when you want to video chat.

qtox skype alternative

Installing qTox in Ubuntu 16.10:
Just copy-paste the following commands into Terminal one by one (keyboard shortcut: CTRL+ALT+T).

sudo sh -c "echo 'deb http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/antonbatenev:/tox/xUbuntu_16.10/ /' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/qtox.list"
wget -nv http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:antonbatenev:tox/xUbuntu_16.10/Release.key -O Release.key
sudo apt-key add - < Release.key
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install qtox

The first line adds the repository while the second and third line download the key for authentication. Then you update the repositories and install the app, which is ‘qtox’ here.

Installing qTox in Ubuntu 16.04:
Installing qTox in Ubuntu 16.04.2 “Xenial Xerus”, being the latest LTS release. Same as before, copy-paste the following lines to your Terminal.

sudo sh -c "echo 'deb http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/antonbatenev:/tox/xUbuntu_16.04/ /' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/qtox.list"
wget -nv http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:antonbatenev:tox/xUbuntu_16.04/Release.key -O Release.key
sudo apt-key add - < Release.key
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install qtox

Done! After installing you can quick-launch the app from Ubuntu launcher, just search for ‘qTox’. I have installed the app in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 16.10 and Windows 10. The video and voice chat worked across platforms. Tried screen-sharing too with Windows 10, but the experience could have been a lot smoother. But as I understand, qTox is still in active development. So you can expect improvements to happen over time.

qTox is cross-platform and is available on a wide range of OSes. For downloading qTox for your favourite Linux OS (Arch, CentOS, Fedora, openSUSE supported), follow this link. For Windows and OSX installers, see here. qTox is still very much on the bleeding-edge side of things and we strongly recommend adequate testing before using it on production machines. Thank you for reading. Related: Meet the new Skype for Linux Beta.

Linux Academy Rolls Out New Cloud-Based Training Platform


Linux Academy, an online training platform for the Linux OS and cloud computing, on Tuesday announced a public beta rollout of its Cloud Assessments platform, which is designed to let large enterprise firms train and assess their IT workers and prospective job candidates. The academy offers training on a variety of cloud-based platforms, including Amazon Web Services, Open Stack, DevOps, Azure and others. The Cloud Assessments platform will focus initially on training and testing of AWS, due to strong demand.

Malware Found Preinstalled on Dozens of Android Phones


Malware has been discovered preinstalled on 36 Android phones belonging to two companies, security software maker Check Point reported. “In all instances, the malware was not downloaded to the device as a result of the users’ use — it arrived with it,” noted Oren Koriat, a member of Check Point’s Mobile Research Team. The malicious apps on the phones of a telecommunications company and a multinational technology business were not part of the official ROM supplied by the vendor, he explained. They were added somewhere along the supply chain.