[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

Linux and the Post-XP Cry for Help


Well the Linux landscape shifted dramatically last week, and not just because of the discovery of the Heartbleed bug. No indeed, there’s another key reason this little planet of ours isn’t the same as it was a week ago, and that’s none other than Windows XP’s long-anticipated end of life. “As of April 8, 2014, support and updates for Windows XP are no longer available,” wrote Microsoft. The news was hardly any surprise, of course — but neither was the cry for help that rang out soon thereafter in the Linux blogosphere.

Desperately Seeking Linux Programmers


Help Wanted: computer programmers needed to code and maintain Linux systems. The Linux operating system and Linux servers are so widely used today that not enough Linux-trained coders and system techs exist. Software developers and enterprise IT departments have jobs but no takers. To fill this shortage, the Linux Foundation has partnered with edX to offer a free online course to help computer engineers learn Linux. On the job front, some industry leaders are joining forces to jumpstart a movement to help ease the growing shortage.

CAELinux Is the Ideal Distro for Designing Scientists


CAELinux is a perfect example of the power of open source to tailor the Linux operating system to users’ specialized needs. This computer-assisted engineering distro clearly is not for the vast majority of Linux users, but it certainly has all the features you would expect in any mature Linux OS — and then some. The extra ingredients make CAELinux a unique Linux distro for engineers and engineering students, as well as scientists. It offers an unusual mix of Xubuntu 12.04 LTS 64-bit with a customized Xfce desktop environment.

SDF Cofounder Chris Davis: Bad Guys Will Need a New M.O.


In the war against malware, a new strategy is taking shape. The good guys are preparing to demolish the bad guys’ most effective weapons: rogue websites. The Secure Domain Foundation will tackle the identification and prevention of Internet cybercrime through a series of steps designed to interfere with the way cybergangs operate online. Making its debut last month at ICANN 49 in Singapore, SDF is a coalition of experts and companies in the cybersecurity, Internet and domain name infrastructure industries. SDF is the brainchild of security researcher Chris Davis and Internet security guru Norm Ritchie.

FOSS Community Hustles to Fix Gaping Heartbleed Flaw


A flaw in OpenSSL that has been around since 2011, the Heartbleed Bug, lets hackers steal information protected by the SSL/TLS encryption used to secure the Internet. Codenomics, which co-discovered the flaw at about the same time as Google’s Neel Mehta, tested some of its own services and found it could steal “the secret keys used for our X.509 certificates, user names and passwords, instant messages, emails and business-critical documents and information, without using any privileged information or credentials.”

Lessons Learned from Mozilla’s Edgy Eich Episode


It seems fair to say that we here in the Linux blogosphere are no strangers to difficult topics, but over the past few weeks FOSS fans have been struggling with what may be one of the trickiest yet. It is, of course, the matter of Brendan Eich. Cofounder of Mozilla, creator of JavaScript, Mozilla CTO for years and then CEO for just 10 days, Eich’s term at the helm was cut short as a result of a firestorm of protest over his donation back in 2008 to the campaign for California Proposition 8 opposing same-sex marriage.

Eich Falls on Sword for Mozilla


Mozilla Foundation cofounder Brendan Eich — whose recent appointment as CEO of subsidiary Mozilla Corp. sparked an uproar — on Thursday stepped down from the post in a bid to keep the company viable. Foundation cofounder and CEO Mitchell Baker painted the move as a return to the foundation’s core principles, noting that Eich made the decision “for Mozilla and our community.” Mozilla “prides itself on being held to a different standard and, this past week, we didn’t live up to it,” Baker said.

Calligra 2.8 Is Too Sweet for Words Alone


If you spend any amount of time creating documents, graphics or organizing data into reports or visual presentations, drop whatever collection of tools you use and put the Calligra Suite to the test. The Calligra Suite is a forked set of office tools for the KDE desktop that branched off the stalled KOffice suite. However, you do not have to run the KDE environment in your Linux distro to get this intriguing advanced office suite. It runs on any desktop flavor.

One of the Largest Online Retailers of Computers in UK has just started shipping Ubuntu Laptops!

Years have passed since we made this list featuring many of the most prominent retailers of Ubuntu and Linux pre-installed laptops and desktops of the time. But the current state of affairs leaves a lot to be desired. Choice is still meagre when it comes to hardware even though the likes of System76 has made the life of an average Linux user a lot easier. Now, we have a new kid in the block. Ebuyer.com is one of the largest independent online retailers of Computers and electronics in UK. And they have decided to go Ubuntu!
ebuyer sells ubuntu laptop


Ebuyer to start selling Ubuntu Laptops!

Ebuyer will join a niche group of retailers who will sell Ubuntu pre-installed laptops and desktops. Ebuyer.com, being one of the largest online retailers in UK, will be able to add significant value to the Linux hardware scene, we hope.
dell ubuntu laptop

The HP 255 G1 will be the frist laptop to come pre-installed with Ubuntu. The laptop is already available for pre-order at a £219.99 price-tag. Delivery will commence starting from 25th of April, 2014. The 15.6 inch laptop is powered by an AMD Dual Core E1 processor, has 4GB of RAM and a 750GB Hard Drive.

Head of Consumer Electronics at Ebuyer, Lee Weymouth, believes offering an open operating system will give consumers some much needed variation in the laptop market. “We’re selling the ‘No OS’ notebook to give customers a wider choice with what operating system they want to install. Windows or MAC OS may be the most popular on the market but there are still options out there and this Ubuntu OS is a great alternative to the big boys,” he adds.

UK readers, how big a change is this? How significant a retailer is Ebuyer.com? Please share your comments below. For more info, see the official blog post.

Would You Like Your Open Source All the Way?


The enterprise software industry today can be compared to the menus offered at fast-food eateries. Some offer their star item only one way. Others let you have it your way. How much choice you have often determines where you do your eating. The same option — or lack of it — is the driving principal behind attracting and keeping enterprise customers paying for open source product support. Even when businesses funded their own code solutions, the freedom to build it your way or buy it somebody else’s way was a critical choice.