[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

NotCompatible Mobile Malware Gets Badder


A new version of the NotCompatible malware, which first appeared in 2012, is bigger, badder and pretty much indestructible, Lookout Security reported. And it can compromise corporate networks, thanks to the BYOD trend. The malware, called “NotCompatible C,” focuses on Android devices. “Given this is an Android Trojan and the app is not trusted by Google, it would need the ‘Unknown Sources’ special permissions to install,” said Malwarebytes analyst Armando Orozco. “So users just have to not install apps from untrusted sources.”

Cinnamon Desktop Spices Up Makulu Linux


The Makulu Cinnamon Debian Edition 1.1 marks a new path for Makulu. This latest release has numerous new features that could make it a top competitor against the Linux Mint Cinnamon edition. Makulu Cinnamon Debian Edition, or MCDE, has fewer standard apps than the previous Makulu Xfce and KDE versions offered. Dropping the kitchen sink philosophy has made it a lot less unwieldy. MCDE has much going for it. However, one critical concern keeps me from making it my permanent Linux Mint Cinnamon replacement: Makulu is a one-person distro.

Jolla’s Open Source Tablet Gets Crazy Crowd Love


Jolla, the company set up by former Nokia executives to keep the Meego operating system alive, raised more than $841,000 on Wednesday, the first day of its crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. That’s 221 percent of its goal of $380,000 — and the campaign has 21 days to go, closing Dec. 9. Nearly 5,325 people have contributed to the campaign, although only about 3,800 actually purchased the tablets. The first 1,000 contributors got the tablet for $189; the next 1,000 for $199, and both lots sold out fast.

When Microsoft Went A-Courting


FOSS fans perhaps may be excused if they’ve felt a bit confused over the past few days. Dizziness, headaches and vertigo also have been common. What strange new ailment is this, you might ask? Well, it’s no ailment — but that doesn’t mean it’s any simpler to remedy. The cause, it turns out, is none other than the news that Microsoft is open sourcing .Net and also expanding it to run on Linux and Mac OS. Yes, you heard that right: Steve Ballmer once may have called Linux a “cancer,” but today Redmond has a newfound “love” for Linux.

CAINE Provides Sturdy Support for Forensic Specialists


CAINE is a professional-grade digital forensic Linux distro. It uses an old-school desktop environment hardened with top-notch specialty tools. CAINE provides tight security and built-in digital investigation tools, but it is less inviting for non-forensic specialists to use as an everyday Linux desktop. However, it could serve the purpose for users who are willing to handle several interface inconveniences. CAINE is built around a complete investigative environment that integrates existing software tools as software modules.

The US Government’s Tenuous Relationship With Open Source


The amount of open source software used by the U.S. government might well be one of the biggest secrets in Washington. Not even purveyors of FOSS, as in free and open source software, know the extent of federal agency adoption of nonproprietary software. Some in the Beltway Loop contend that open source is very prevalent. Others suggest that open source is avoided because its code is exposed for anyone to see. One thing seems very sure, however. Most government agencies cling to well-known commercial software for desktop services.

Firefox Develops a Case of Selective Amnesia


Mozilla on Monday announced an updated version of its open source browser complete with a new Forget button aimed at protecting users’ privacy. “Forget gives you an easy way to tell Firefox to clear out some of your recent activity,” explained Firefox Vice President Johnathan Nightingale. “Instead of asking a lot of complex technical questions, Forget asks you only one: How much do you want to forget? Once you tell Firefox you want to forget the last five minutes, or two hours, or 24 hours, it takes care of the rest.”

YOLOTD: Could 2015 Be Linux’s Big Year?


It’s no secret that the Linux community has been in a state of upheaval these last few months, thanks to a little piece of technology known as “Systemd.” That the strife has been divisive hardly can be disputed. That it’s been distracting us from more important matters is the case Linux Girl would like to make today. Need an example? Here you go: When was the last time you participated in a rousing revival of the good old “Year of Linux on the Desktop” debate? Hard to remember, isn’t it? That’s because it’s been a long time.

Black Lab Linux Is GNOME 3′s Best Friend


Black Lab Linux is a general purpose free distribution for home users and SMBs. This particular segment of the Linux OS tries to bridge free OS and preconfigured commercial hardware/software with a flexible set of options. Black Lab Linux is an outgrowth of OS4 OpenLinux, a distro released in 2008 by the same developers. There is a blurred line between the free community version and Black Lab Software’s Enterprise Linux release. Both the community and the commercial releases could be a great alternative for some users, though.

Kano: The Can-Do Coding Kit for Kids of All Ages


“So simple a child could do it” — I have heard that expression abused often in advertising. Yet it aptly applies to the Kano computer kit. Kano is a computer and coding kit that is suitable for all ages. Well, to be truthful, Kano’s step-by-step instructions in the included booklets and its simplified Linux-based operating system target kids aged 6 to 14. That said, the hands-on method it uses to teach basic computer structure and coding principles will work for kids of all ages.