[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

Android L Will Keep Your Secrets Safer


Hard on the heels of increased security measures in Apple’s newly released iOS 8, Google this week confirmed that encryption will be turned on by default in the next release of Android. Android has offered encryption for more than three years, and keys are not stored off the device, so they can’t be shared with law enforcement, Google said. In the next Android release, encryption will be enabled by default. Like Apple’s new measures, the heightened security planned for Android L is in part a reaction to the widespread privacy concerns.

Red Hat Slurps Up FeedHenry


Red Hat on Thursday announced that it will acquire FeedHenry as part of a stepped-up initiative to support mobile application development. “Given the sheer number of mobile phones out there and the sheer adoption in the market at large of mobile technologies, our customers and prospects and target customer base are moving more and more toward mobile — if not as a primary platform then as a major one for supporting enterprise applications,” said Mike Piech, Red Hat’s general manager for middleware.

Opera Sings for Linux Users, With Just a Few Sour Notes


Opera offers an interesting alternative to the Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Web browsers, but its recent Linux release leaves some room for improvement. Opera previously enjoyed a reputation as the go-to browser of choice for mobile environments. However, Opera Software, the developer, ignored Linux users for quite a long while until now. Opera’s Version 12.16 is a very usable release — but it is not without drawbacks.
Perhaps its biggest accomplishment is creating a library of Firefox-like extensions.

BitTorrent Bleep reaches open Alpha: Secure peer-to-peer chat client (voice & text) downloadable for Android, Mac, Windows (Linux coming soon)

bittorrent bleep for android

People don’t take online privacy and security lightly anymore. TOX could soon become the safest Skype alternative we’ll have been waiting for. There has been a barrage of WhatsApp alternatives that respects your privacy ever since its acquisition by Facebook. Bleep, a peer-to-peer chat client with voice and text messaging capabilities, takes things to a whole new level. Could Bleep be the safe and secure alternative to Viber and even WhatsApp to an extent?

BitTorrent Bleep for Android
  • Bleep is currently in alpha, so it is still pretty rough around the edges.
  • Bleep is a peer-to-peer chat client, meaning there’s no central server that can see your messages or metadata.
  • Use it on WiFi only for the time being (consumes more data and battery than it normally should, fixes are on the way). 
  • Messages sent are fully encrypted and stored locally.
  • Bleep is NOT open source, which makes it harder to verify their claims.
peer to peer chat for android

PredictionIO’s Simon Chan on Machine Learning by Devs for Devs


PredictionIO is building the MySQL of prediction. The young company recently released version 0.7.3 of its open source machine-learning server. Unlike typical prediction algorithms and open source libraries, PredictionIO is based on making machine learning available to software developers. Cofounder Simon Chan sees a gaping hole in open source tools to connect database programmers and software developers. The new project’s goal is to make it easier and more reliable for devs to use their database content to create predictive features.

Is It Time to Cleave Linux in Two?


Fires may be easy to start, but putting them out is a different matter. Case in point: the Systemd inferno. What started a few weeks ago as a relatively straightforward controversy over an oft-debated technology Visit the VMware Tech Center has now virtually blown up in Linux fans’ faces. The latest flareup? None other than the suggestion that Linux be split in two. “I’d argue that to some degree it has already happened,” began Google+ blogger Kevin O’Brien. “RHEL is very big in data centers, but who runs it as a desktop?”

7 Crazy-Named, Crazy Good Open Source Enterprise IT Tools


Enterprise IT is a very serious matter, but you might not know it judging by the software tools that are often integral to its operations. The list of odd names in today’s data centers and enterprise IT shops also highlights the ongoing trend of polyglot programming. Today’s applications and services are based on a wider variety of application components and run on a wider array of infrastructure that includes bare metal servers, traditional data centers, virtual environments, and public, private or hybrid clouds.

MEGA has a Linux client now, offers up to 50 GB of free space and client-side encryption!

MEGAsync for linux

For Linux users, there are plenty of Dropbox alternatives, MEGAsync being the latest entrant. The service was the brain child of Kim Dotcom, founder of now defunct Megaupload, and it was launched on 19 January 2013 to coincide with the one-year anniversary of the seizure of his previous enterprise. MEGAsync now has a dedicated Linux client as well (unlike Google Drive). 


MEGAsync’s client for Linux released

The biggest and obvious attractions of MEGAsync are the massive 50 GB of free storage and its client side end-to-end encryption capabilities which makes it one of the most private and secure cloud storage services out there. Obviously one should not trust any cloud storage services with their sensitive data, but client side encryption capabilities gives MEGAsync a clear advantage.
MEGAsync for linux client

MEGAsync also offers good Nautilus integration functionality which makes it super easy to sync any particular directory in your drive with Mega’s online cloud service.

If you are on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, simply download the appropriate DEB package and double click to install it OR use command-line like this:
sudo dpkg -i ~/Downloads/megasync-xUbuntu_14.04_amd64.deb
MEGA currently provides a multi-platform software development kit, and have plans to release the source code to MEGAsync under an open-source license. Read more here

The Importance of Openness to the Internet of Things


Consumers today are in an awkward position. Personal privacy is being wiped out by the Internet. At the same time, new technologies that interconnect our devices with our homes and office environments are offering stupendous advantages. Welcome to the Internet of Things’ new world of openness. “Openness” means something different depending on whether you’re basking in the convenience of all things connected or contributing to the monetized cash flow that connected-product purveyors get from your personal information.

Springseed Cultivates Note-Taking Simplicity


Springseed is a simple note-taking app for Linux that features full Markdown language support. Most Linux note and text-editing tools do not incorporate Markdown symbols. The real beauty of this feature is that you do not have to use it. You still have a minimalistic yet very efficient note-taking tool that doubles as a Markdown editor.
The Markdown language, created in 2004, lets you write easy-to-use codes in plain text format. This method lets you convert the text to structurally valid XHTML or HTML display if needed.