[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

Vinux Enhances Productivity for Visually Impaired Users

Vinux 5.0 is a striking example of the flexibility and usability of the Linux OS. Vinux is a fully functional Linux distro that caters to blind and partially sighted users. It’s based on Ubuntu Trusty Tahr 14.04.3 LTS and gives users support through 2019. The latest version was released earlier this month. It greatly improves on the usability features of other Linux distributions. By default, it provides two screen readers and Braille display support plus a community keenly tuned into the needs of sight-challenged users.

Microsoft Doubles Down on Open Source

Microsoft this week announced at its Connect conference in New York City an expansion of its developer tools with a focus on Linux, Android and open source. The move is an effort to help close the gap between Microsoft’s developer platforms and the open source world. The programs involve free access for developers who are just getting started, a new subscription to Microsoft services, a marketplace for extensions, updates to .NET, and the renaming of Visual Studio Online.

Docker, Yubico Team Up to Secure App Development

Docker this week announced new security enhancements at DockerCon EU in Barcelona, Spain, including hardware signing of container images — an industry first — through a partnership with Yubico. Docker Content Trust offers hardware signing through support for Yubico’s YubiKey. The YubiKey 4 lets Docker users digitally sign code during initial development and through subsequent updates, ensuring the integrity of Dockerized apps throughout the application pipeline, Yubico said.

FBI Paid Carnegie Mellon $1M to Crack User IDs, Claims Tor

The Tor Project last week claimed the FBI paid Carnegie Mellon University $1 million to crack the anonymity of Tor users. Tor’s claim appears to have been triggered by a report last week that said the FBI’s arrest of an alleged member of the Silk Road 2.0 drug ring was based on “information obtained by a ‘university-based research institute’ that operated its own computers on the anonymous network used by Silk Road 2.0.” That network was Tor, and the research institute was Carnegie Mellon, Tor said.

Ubuntu Studio Is a Treasure Trove for Creative Types

Ubuntu Studio 15.10 is a one-stop Linux OS shop for most creative people. It bundles a nearly full range of multimedia content-creation applications for workflows involving audio, graphics, video, photography and publishing. The developers describe this distro as a multimedia content-creation hub for all five creative workflows. The last element — publishing — is the weakest link. The publishing category in terms of the traditional wordsmithing genre is missing.

Linux Leaders Join HPC Devs on Open Source Framework

The Linux Foundation on Thursday announced that it’s forming the OpenHPC Collaborative Project to push the software supply to support high-powered computing. The project will provide a new open source framework to meet HPC’s unique application demands and parallel runtime requirements, the organization said. The framework will provide upstream project components, tools and interconnections to enable the software stack. The HPC components will contribute to a full-featured reference software stack for developers, system admins and users.

Valve’s Steam Gaming Hardware Hits Home

Valve this week rolled out the hardware phase of its road map from bedrooms and basements to living rooms and lounge areas with its long-awaited video game controller, PC link box and Steam boxes. Valve’s road map to the living room began with Big Picture mode in 2011, continued with in-home streaming in 2014, and now includes the new Steam hardware. The Linux-based Big Picture mode formatted the Steam digital distribution platform for living room TVs, offering an experience similar to Xbox Live.

Purism’s Librem 13 Linux Laptop Is Sleek, Private and Secure

The combination of custom-made hardware and a tweaked Linux OS makes the Librem laptop lineup a unique offering with several innovative security features not offered in any other computer. The Librem line is a work in progress. The OS just reached version 2.0 and comes preinstalled on the hardware built with the modified Linux kernel in mind. LinuxInsider received one of the first available Librem 13-inch units for review. Our hands-on testing shows the hardware/software combo is an impressive display of the power and finesse of Linux.

Decryption Tool Foils Linux Server Ransomware Attacks

Bitdefender on Monday released a free decryption tool designed to wrest data from the grip of a rare type of ransomware that’s been plaguing Linux servers. Details for performing the decryption are available on the company’s website. Essentially, the solution takes advantage of a flaw in the ransomware, which Bitdefender discovered through reverse-engineering. The ransomware attacks came to light last week, when Dr.Web reported that extortionists have been exploiting vulnerabilities in software running on Linux servers.

Google Opens Floodgates for TensorFlow Development

Google on Monday announced the release of TensorFlow, its second-generation machine learning system, to the open source community. It’s offering TensorFlow as a standalone library with associated tools, tutorials and examples under the Apache 2.0 license. Google uses TensorFlow in deep learning, Google Search and other applications. Apps built with TensorFlow can move seamlessly from desktops to mobile phones, and the system is ready for production.