[sticky] Tired of paying for Windows? Linux is your answer!

Welcome to PrescottLinux.com, we are a local team dedicated to informing dispirited computer users of the tri-city area that there is an alternative to Microsoft Windows. You may very well have a Dell PC right now, did you know you paid Microsoft a percentage of the cost of that PC? With Microsoft’s versions of Windows, you are paying them for the privilege of providing you with an operating system that will open you up viruses, spyware, and all types of malware. Windows by far is the biggest platform for attracting all the unwanted nuisances floating around on the Internet.

If you have kids in the house going online, then you probably have had problems with your Windows computer catching a virus, and all the popups, hijacking of your computer, etc. It is an expensive nightmare to try to get that computer cleaned out. That’s where Linux has a huge advantage over Windows- It is designed from the ground-up with security in mind.

Linux is Free and Open Source Software, a concept known by the acronym, FOSS. As such, you don’t have to pay for Linux, most of the software that runs on Linux is also free and open source. All your favorite applications, such as Mozilla Firefox, web browser, Mozilla Thunderbird E-mail client, Sun’s Open Office, their office suite that is compatible with Microsoft’s Office, as well as many other programs you are probably using already.

Linux also gives you freedom from knowing that there isn’t a big, centralized corporation controlling what do you with your computer, with just its shareholders in mind.

We will add more posts here to explain the virtues of Linux periodically and hope to inform the public.

Nokia X, We Hardly Knew Ye


“I told you so” is a refrain that’s oft-heard here in the Linux blogosphere, and more often than not it refers to some fleeting Microsoft tie with FOSS that subsequently goes wrong. The latest example? It’s a doozy. Redmond not only is laying off many, many thousands — most of them in its ill-fated Nokia unit — but also abandoning its short-lived support of Android through the Nokia X line. “We will be particularly focused on making the market for Windows Phone,” wrote Microsoft devices chief Stephen Elop in an email last week to employees.

Red Hat’s Inktank Buy Bears 1st Fruit


Scarcely two months have passed since Red Hat announced its plans to acquire open source storage company Inktank, but already the union has produced results: Inktank Ceph Enterprise 1.2, which made its debut on Wednesday. Ceph is a scalable, open source, software-defined storage system that runs on commodity hardware, and the Inktank Enterprise version is designed to deliver object and block storage software to enterprises deploying public or private clouds.

Android Sets iPhone Cloning Factory in Motion


Chinese company Wico has cloned the yet-to-be-released iPhone 6, if a pair of videos can be believed. “The similarities are eerily close,” said Ramon Llamas, a research manager at IDC, to the extent that the casual observer “may just simply accept this as an iPhone.” There are slight differences on the sides, such as the volume and power buttons and the headphone jacks, as well as the chassis overall, but “it’s not until you place them side by side that you can see the differences,” Llamas noted.

KaOS Calms Down KDE


KaOS is an interesting and very efficient Linux distribution built around a refined KDE desktop environment. The KDE integration is much more controlled in KaOS than in other Linux choices. The latest release for this 14-month young Linux distro came in late June. KaOS is a bit of a rarity. It is independent of other distros — not a direct relative of other Linux offshoots. That means it does not rely on repositories developed and maintained by larger Linux communities.

Linux Remote Control goes native on Android

linux remote control android
We have covered Linux Remote Control before which is a simple web based application for Android (and other devices that has support for HTML 5). It lets you “remote-control” Ubuntu abd other Linux based distros from your Android phone with ease. LRC for Android can now be installed from Firefox marketplace making the whole process so much smoother.

Linux Remote Control: Salient Features
  • Control the music/sound of your computer (play, pause, stop, mute, volume etc.)
  • Controlling videos from your computer (play, pause, mute, volume, fullscreen etc.)
  • Control your computer mouse (click and move).
  • Lock and unlock your computer screen.
  • Restart and shut down your computer.
  • Increase and decrease the brightness of your computer screen.
  • Control slides for presentations going back and forth.
  • Send custom commands to run on your GNU/Linux.
Installing Linux Remote Control (LRC) Server in Ubuntu
  • You need to install LRC server on the desktop like we have already described in detail in our previous post. Here’s what you need to do.
  • For Ubuntu and other other Debian based distros, download the LRC DEB package and click to install it using Ubuntu Software Center (I prefer GDebi), simple as that.
  • OR You could use command line method as described in our previous post. 
  • There were some warnings, but I chose to ‘ignore and install’ instead (it worked).
Installing Linux Remote Control (LRC) Client in Android
  • What changed here is the way you install the e client on your phone. LRC Client is now available for installation from Firefox marketplace.
I already have LRC client on my Android and hence I didn’t had to install it from Firefox Marketplace. Let me know how well it worked. See also: Linux Remote Control homepage.

Is Firefox in a Fix?


It’s been difficult to hear ourselves think here in the Linux blogosphere lately, what with all the distractions that have been thrown our way. We’ve had the NSA casting aspersions on Linux users; we’ve had the IRS looking askance at FOSS. We’ve even had the well-respected Tor Project sucked into a lawsuit over revenge porn, of all things. Ready for the latest? None other than this: “Is Firefox dying a slow death?” That, indeed, was the headline over at ITworld, and variations on the theme could be heard elsewhere in the blogosphere as well.

New IoT Group to Get Devices Talking Among Themselves


Half a dozen companies this week launched the Open Interconnect Consortium to define the connectivity requirements and improve the interoperability of some 200 billion devices expected to make up the Internet of Things by 2020. The consortium will focus on defining a common communications framework based on industry standard technologies to wirelessly connect and intelligently manage the flow of information among personal computing and emerging IoT devices, regardless of form factor, operating system or service provider.

Tor Embroiled in $1M Revenge-Porn Lawsuit


Texas attorney Jason L. Van Dyke recently filed a lawsuit against nude-photo-sharing site Pink Meth and included the Tor Project among its defendants. Pink Meth is an “involuntary pornography” site, the suit charges, enabling users to post nude photos for the purposes of getting revenge on those pictured. It’s accessible only to users who have downloaded Tor’s anonymity-minded software. The plaintiff named in the case is allegedly a victim of Pink Meth’s service who was caused mental anguish and loss of earning capacity as a result.

LG G Watch Rides In on 1st Android Wear Wave


LG has launched its Android Wear-powered G Watch around the world. The smartwatch can be ordered from Google Play and purchased at retailers in the United States, Canada, France, Ireland, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, Australia, India, Japan and South Korea.
In 15 other countries — including Brazil, Mexico, Russia, Singapore and New Zealand — the device will be available only from retailers. The LG G Watch is selling for $229 in the U.S. The LG G Watch is one of the first Android Wear devices to hit the market.

‘Extreme’ Computing and Other Linux-World Problems


Well another Independence Day has come and gone here in the land of stars and stripes, causing at least some in the tech blogosphere to turn their thoughts toward freedom. “Digital independence day: Your guide to DIY, open-source, anonymous free computing” was one offering. “It’s Time for IT Pros to Declare Their Technology Freedom” was another. Unfortunately, for those of us here in the Linux blogosphere — where freedom has always been part of the plan — other headlines have had, shall we say, a moderating effect on all that enthusiasm.